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27 days ago by Libby McCaughey

How to help improve your Mental Wellbeing

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Mental health problems can affect anyone, at any time. You might not be talking about it because sadly mental health is still a very taboo subject. Many still feel uncomfortable and scared to talk about it let alone confronting the issue in the workplace. There are a number of small simple steps that you can take to help maintain a healthy mental wellbeing at work.

Here are five simple ways to wellbeing suggested by Mind.

Connect

Extensive research has shown that feeling close to and valued by other people is a “fundamental human need and one that contributes to functioning well in the world”. (Mind)

It is apparent that social relationships are important to the promotion of wellbeing and acts as a safeguard against mental ill health in people of all ages.

Knowing this Mind suggest trying something new today and make a connection:

  • Talk to someone instead of sending an email
  • Speak to someone new
  • Ask how someone’s weekend was and really listen when they tell you
  • Put five minutes aside to find out how someone really is
  • Give a colleague a lift to work or share the journey home with them. (Mind)

Be active

There is a direct correlation between how often you participate in physical activity and a reduction in rates of depression and anxiety across all ages groups that participated in a study. It has been proven “exercise is essential for slowing age related cognitive decline and for promoting well-being”.

The physical activity doesn’t need to be intense in order for it to be good for you – slow-paced activates like walking can not only provide a level of exercise but also encourage social interactions.

Here are some suggestions form Mind to try today:

  • Take the stairs not the lift
  • Go for a walk at lunchtime
  • Walk into work - perhaps with a colleague – so you can ‘connect’ as well
  • Get off the bus one stop earlier than usual and walk the final part of your journey to work
  • Organise a work sporting activity
  • Have a kick-about in a local park
  • Do some ‘easy exercise’, like stretching, before you leave for work in the morning
  • Walk to someone’s desk instead of calling or emailing.

Learn

To help encourage social interactions, be more active in life and enhance self-esteem, you need to continue to be open to learn. Anecdotal evidence suggests “the opportunity to engage in work or educational activities particularly helps to lift older people out of depression.” (Mind)

If you practice setting yourself goals related to adult leaning, there is research to suggest it will promote higher levels of wellbeing.

Learn something new today… Here are a few ideas suggested by Mind:

  • Find out something about your colleagues
  • Sign up for a class
  • Read the news or a book
  • Set up a book club
  • Do a crossword or Sudoku
  • Research something you’ve always wondered about
  • Learn a new word.

Take notice

To help strengthen and broaden your awareness remind yourself to ‘take notice’. Multiple studies have shown that the more you are aware of what is taking place around you in the present it directly enhances your wellbeing and savouring ‘the moment’.

A heightened awareness also enhances your self-understanding and allows you to make positive choices based on your own values and motivations.

It’s important to take some time for yourself and enjoy the moment. Take some guidance from the ideas suggested by Mind:

  • Get a plant for your workspace
  • Have a ‘clear the clutter’ day
  • Take notice of how your colleagues are feeling or acting
  • Take a different route on your journey to or from work
  • Visit a new place for lunch.

Give

Taking part in social and community life has been central to the research around wellbeing. Many who reported greater interest in helping others were more likely to rate themselves as happy.

Research into actions for promoting happiness has shown that committing an act of kindness once a week over a six-week period is associated with an increase in wellbeing.

Metal health is personal and perceived differently to each individual so use these as guidelines rather than definitive rules to help improve and promote positive mental wellbeing for yourself and share as advice for those around you.

For more help, guidance and information about taking care of yourself please visit the Mind website via the link below.

Mind: https://www.mind.org.uk/workplace/mental-health-at-work/taking-care-of-yourself/